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Horse Chestnut Powder
Horse Chestnut Powder


 

Product Code: HCTN-HB


1 oz Net Wt [$2.64]
2 oz Net Wt [$5.03]
4 oz Net Wt [$9.56]
8 oz Net Wt [$18.11]
16 oz Net Wt - 1 lb [$34.21]
32 oz Net Wt - 2 lbs [$64.40]
80 oz Net Wt - 5 lbs [$140.88]

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Details Ingredients & Technical Specs
 

Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) is a large deciduous tree that is native to a small area in the mountains of the Balkans in southeast Europe, in small areas in northern Greece, Albania, the Republic of Macedonia, Serbia, and Bulgaria. It is widely cultivated throughout the temperate world.

It grows to 36 m tall, with a domed crown of stout branches, on old trees the outer branches often pendulous with curled-up tips. The flowers are usually white with a small red spot; they are produced in spring in erect panicles 10-30 cm tall with about 20-50 flowers on each panicle. Usually only 1-5 fruit develop on each panicle; the fruit is a green, softly spiky capsule containing one (rarely two or three) nut-like seeds called conkers or horse-chestnuts. Each conker is 2-4 cm diameter, glossy nut-brown with a whitish scar at the base.

The name is very often given as just 'Horse-chestnut' or 'Horse Chestnut'; the addition of 'Common' to the name however helps distinguish it from other species of horse-chestnut.

During the two world wars, horse-chestnuts were used as a source of starch which in turn could be used via the Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation method devised by Chaim Weizmann to produce acetone. This acetone was then used as a solvent which aided in the process of ballistite extrusion into cordite, which was then used in military armaments.

In the past, Horse-chestnut seeds were used in France and Switzerland for whitening hemp, flax, silk and wool. They contain a soapy juice, fit for washing of linens and stuffs, for milling of caps and stockings, etc., and for fulling of cloth. For this, 20 horse-chestnut seeds were sufficient for six liters of water. They were peeled, then rasped or dried, and ground in a malt or other mill. The water must be soft, either rain or river water; hard well water will not work. The nuts are then steeped in cold water, which soon becomes frothy, as with soap, and then turns milky white. The liquid must be stirred well at first, and then, after standing to settle, strained or poured off clear. Linen washed in this liquid, and afterwards rinsed in clear running water, takes on an agreeable light sky-blue color. It takes spots out of both linen and wool, and never damages or injures the cloth.

Horse-chestnuts can be used to make jewelry using the conkers as beads. The Horse-chestnut, like some of the other members of the Aesculus genus, can also be known as buckeye, though this term is usually reserved for the New World species.


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